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Nursing: Rocket-powered Referencing

It's time to play: What's that reference?

Janssen, V. (2012). Indirect tracking of drop bears using GNSS technology. Australian Geographer, 43(4), 445-452. doi:10.1080/00049182.2012.731307

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Click on the type of item you think this reference shows.

Is this a:

What gives it away? 
  • Volume number, issue number
  • Article title AND journal name
  • Page range (part of something bigger)
  • Italics for larger container
  • No editor
  • No place of location
  • No publisher

Stabler-Haas, S. (2012). Fast facts for the student nurse: Nursing student success in a nutshell. New York, NY: Springer.

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Click on the type of item you think this reference shows.

Is this a:

What gives it away? 
  • No volume number, no issue number
  • No page range (complete work in itself)
  • Italics for larger container, no sub-section
  • Place of publication
  • Publisher

Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia. (2016). Registered nurse standards for practice. Retrieved from http://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/documents/default.aspx?record=WD16%2F19524&dbid=AP&chksum=R5Pkrn8yVpb9bJvtpTRe8w%3D%3D

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Click on the type of item you think this reference shows.

Is this a:

What gives it away? 
  • Web address opens a PDF file
  • No volume or issue numbers
  • No place of publication or publisher
  • No page numbers

Federation University Australia. (2016). FedUni Gippsland campus tour [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQ3SBI7Iado

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Click on the type of item you think this reference shows.

Is this a:

What gives it away? 
  • Format identifier [Video file]
  • Web address on YouTube
  • No volume or issue numbers
  • No place of publication or publisher

Australian Nursing & Midwifery Federation Victorian Branch. (2014). Membership benefits. Retrieved from http://www.anmfvic.asn.au/membership/anmf-vic-branch-membership-benefits

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Click on the type of item you think this reference shows.

Is this a:

What gives it away? 
  • Web address take you to a web page
  • No format identifier
  • No place of publication or publisher
  • No volume or edition numbers

Thomas, J. (2010). Public health. In D. Sellman & P. Snelling (Eds.), Becoming a nurse: A textbook for professional practice (284-314). Harlow, England: Pearson Education.

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Click on the type of item you think this reference shows.

Is this a:

What gives it away? 
  • Chapter title AND book title
  • Page range (part of something bigger)
  • Italics for larger container (book)
  • Both chapter author(s) AND book editor(s)
  • Place of publication and publisher
  • No volume number or issue number
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Strictly Referencing

screenshot of general guide, indicating template and example numbers

screenshot of Study Skills page

 

Form-based referencing: KnightCite to the rescue!

KnightCite will always generate a correct reference if you:
  • Choose the correct referencing style
  • Choose the correct reference type
  • Fill in all the appropriate fields correctly

screnshot of KnightCite form for generating an APA reference

 
 
 
 
 

Referencing like lightning

               

The referencing feature in QuickSearch tends to be fairly bad for books, and particularly for books that contain chapters written by different authors, where the chapters have been put together by an editor (very common for books in the health field).

For journal articles, the referencing is usually better (not always). However, the DOI (digital object identifier, a code for accessing the article quickly) is often left off, and must be added manually.

From inside any of the options under the book record, click the Actions menu, then click Citation.
screenshot, Actions menu, indicating Citation selection
This is an example of an incomplete book citation from QuickSearch.
screenshot, citation example from QuickSearch

 

You will often have to look inside the book for all the referencing detail, and use the web browser address box for the URL.
screenshot, screenshot from eBook showing book title, editor, publisher screenshot, screenshot from  eBook showing chapter title, chapter author

 

This is what the final reference (a chapter within the ebook) should look like in your reference list:

Santa Barbara, J. (2012). The impact of climate change on human health. In V. I. Grover (Ed.), Impact of climate change on water and health (pp. 75-105). Available from http://ebookcentral.proquest.com

In the text of your assignment, you would cite this as

[the information rewritten in your own words] (Santa Barbara, 2012)

or perhaps occasionally as

Santa Barbara (2012) states that [the information rewritten in your own words]

There is an automatic referencing system called Citation Machine which can help to automatically generate some references for you, with a bit of work.

However, the results can still contain errors, always double-check the resulting references.

From Citation Machine, choose the APA style and the Book option.

Click on Cite a chapter

screenshot, Citation Machine, showing APA style and link to Cite a chapter

Enter the title of the book, NOT the title of the chapter. Click on Search Chapters.

If Citation Machine finds your book, click on the Select button beside it.

If your book has not been found, click on Manual entry mode.

screenshot, Citation Machine, showing APA style and link to Cite a chapter

You will always have to manually enter the title of the chapter.

If not all the authors or editors have been found, click on Add another contributor to add them manually.

I like to add all the chapter authors first - be sure to set them as Section author.

Then I add all the book editors - mark them as Source editor.

Be sure to add all authors and editors in the order they are listed in the book.

screenshot, Citation Machine, showing APA style and link to Cite a chapter

It is not unusual for one person to be both an editor (the only editor, or one of several) and a chapter author (again, sole author or one of several). If so, enter them twice, marking them as both Section author and Source editor.

Keep the lists of authors and editors in the same order as they appear in the book.

screenshot, Citation Machine, showing APA style and link to Cite a chapter

If your book (or chapter) has a DOI (digital object identifier), enter it. Do not worry if one is not provided, but newer books and journal articles often have one.

screenshot, Citation Machine, showing APA style and link to Cite a chapter

Use the Copy & Paste link for trouble-free copying.

screenshot, Citation Machine, showing APA style and link to Cite a chapter

You can then paste the reference into your reference list in Word.

You may still need to add a "hanging indent" to your reference (first line aligns left, subsequent lines are indented). See the Word tips on this page for a quick way to do this.

screenshot, Citation Machine, showing APA style and link to Cite a chapter

There is an automatic referencing system called Citation Machine which will automatically generate some references for you.

However, the results can still contain errors, always double-check the resulting references.

From Citation Machine, choose the APA style and the Journal option.

Enter the title of the article, NOT the title of the journal. Click on Search Journal Articles.

screenshot, Citation Machine, showing APA style and Journal search option

If the article is in Citation Machine's database, click on the Select button next to the article. Otherwise, if the title is not found, click Manual entry mode.

Here there are two results, I will choose the second result because it has the correct title capitalisation.

screenshot, journal results list from RefME

 

Sometimes Citation Machine will warn you that you might need to enter more data manually. For journal articles, the day of publication is not important (but you would need this for newspaper articles).

Click the Final Step button to continue.

screenshot, showing journal details form

Check all the details are correct and present, in particular the volume and issue numbers and the page numbers.

Check that all the authors are present. If some authors are missing, click the Add another contributor link.

Add all authors in the order they appear on the article.

screenshot, showing bottom of form and Generate button

If there is a DOI (digital object identifier) for the article, enter it. The DOI is often found in small print at the top or bottom of the first page of the article. It might also be found in your databases search results.

If you accessed the article electronically and there is no DOI, search for the address of the journal home page and enter that in the URL field e.g. for this journal I would use http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rhsr20/current

Click on Create Citation

screenshot, showing generated reference

Use the Copy & Paste link to correctly copy the formatted reference.

screenshot, showing generated reference

Paste the generated reference into your reference list in Word (remember to check the reference for correctness).

You will still need to add a hanging indent in Word (see the Word tips on this page).

screenshot, showing generated reference

Frequently Asked Question: Referencing a drug entry in MIMS Online

Referencing a MIMS drug entry

MIMS online can be treated as an online reference work for referencing.

You would cite a particular drug entry as something like:

Panadol (children) 3+ years chewable tablets. (2017). In Mims Online. Retrieved from https://www.mimsonline.com.au

Cite in-text as

   ... to ameliorate pain ("Panadol (children) 3+ years chewable tablets", 2017).

The 2017 copyright date for MIMS Online is the copyright data at the bottom of each web page.

Give the generic web address above, not the specific results page, to avoid non-working URLs.

In-text citation tips

  • If you use a direct quote, you must include a page number.
    "chocolate intake was positively associated with cognitive performance" (Crichton et al., 2016, p. 129)
  • Authors
    • One or two authors: Always use both authors: (Jenkins & Tapper, 2014)
    • 3, 4, or 5 authors: Use all their names for the first citation, after that use first author and et al. (Latin for and others, full stop after al. because it is an abbreviation for et alia)
      ... better cognitive performance (Crichton, Elias, & Alkerwi, 2016). This was true regardless of other dietary factors (Crichton et al., 2016)
    • 6 or more authors: Use the first author and et al. all the way through, even the first time: (Kuebler et al., 2015)
  • In-text citations must match the reference list:
but only if it is dark chocolate (Rusconi et al., 2012)
Rusconi, M., Rossi, M. G., Moccetti, T., & Conti, A. (2012). Acute vascular effects of chocolate in healthy human volunteers. In A. Conti, R. Paoletti, A. Poli, & F. Visioli (Eds.), Chocolate and health (pp. 87-102). Milan, Italy: Springer.

 

dangerous for dogs (Department of Primary Industries, 2012).
Department of Primary Industries. (2012). Give a dog a bone, not chocolate this Easter. Retrieved from http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/content/archive/news-releases/agriculture/2012/give-a-dog-a-bone

Word shortcuts for referencing (and other uses)

If you are using a Mac, you will usually have to use the Command or Apple key instead of Ctrl.


Only in Word

Ctrl+T - formats the selected paragraphs (or references) with hanging indents

 

Sorting by A-Z - Word has a feature to sort selected lines or paragraphs (or references) alphabetically. Select your references, and click the A-Z button on the Home tab.

screenshot of Word, indicating locatrion of A-Z sorting icon or button

Changing case - Word has a feature (look for the Aa button) to change case, so you can quickly change it to correct sentence case. (Hint: Ctrl+click will select a whole sentence, which often is enough to select a book or journal article title)

Sentence case is what you want, but sometimes going straight to sentence case doesn't work in Word - if this happens, select your article or book title, first change it to lowercase, then change it to sentence case.

You may also need to manually edit it afterwards to start a sub-title with a capital letter.

screenshot from Word, indicating location of icon to change to sentence case


Use them everywhere

Remember, as it mentions above, if you have a Mac then use Cmmd instead of Ctrl

Ctrl+A - select All

Ctrl+C - Copy

Ctrl+X - cut   (think of X = )

Ctrl+V - paste   (think of V = put it here)

For easier selecting : Put your cursor where you want to start selecting, then hold down Shift and use the arrow keys     on the keyboard to "drag out" the area of selection.